5 DAYS 4 NIGHTS

Day 01, Arrive Mumbai

Arrive Mumbai and upon arrival you will be met and transferred to Hotel Ramee Guest Line (Juhu Beach) (Check in time is 1200 hrs and early check in subject to availability)

Mumbai (formally Bombay), the gateway to India in the days of the British Raj, is today India’s commercial capital. The city dates back to around the first century AD, when the area consisted of seven islands separated by the sea. In 1661 the Portuguese presented the port and islands of Bombay to the British, and in 1668 the East India Company leased all of the islands from the British Government. for £10.00 in gold per year.

On independence in 1947 the Bombay presidency became Bombay state, and subsequently Bombay became the state capital of Maharashtra. Today Mumbai is a fascinating crossroads of the east and west where the sophistication and technology of the first world is combined with the eastern ability to sell almost anything against a backdrop of oriental colour and scent. Besides being the major port Mumbai is the most cosmopolitan, fastest moving, affluent and industrialized city in India. It is India’s financial, commercial and industrial centre, and the centre of the film industry (Bollywood).

Dinner will be served at Ramee Guest Line

Overnight in Mumbai Ramee Guest Line (Juhu) – Club Room

Day 02 Mumbai Sightseeing

Breakfast at hotel

Morning visit to the Gateway of India and Elephanta Island. (Subject to weather conditions) The Gateway of India, Mumbai’s most striking monument, is an imposing arch in the Indo-Saracenic style with Gujarati and Islamic elements. It was built to commemorate the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to India in 1911. Near the Gateway is a statue of Shivaji, the 17th century founder of the independent Hindu Kingdom of Maharashtra.

An hour’s boat-ride, 6 miles across the Arabian Sea from Gateway, is the small but celebrated island of Elephanta, famous for its Elephanta Cave Temples. Carved into the island’s solid stone, the base relief carvings are magnificent. The Portuguese renamed this island Elephanta after a large stone elephant found near the shore.

Lunch will be served at a Local Restaurant

Afternoon sightseeing of the city, visiting the Prince of Wales Museum, Mani Bhawan, Dhobi Ghat, Crawford Market and Drive along Marine Drive.

Princes of Wales Museum: Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Museum previously known as Princes of Wales Museum was built to commemorate the visit of the King George V’s first visit to India in 1905 when he was still the Prince of Wales, and opened in 1914. With sections on art, archaeology and natural history, it houses rare and ancient exhibits of India’s history as well as objects from foreign lands. Also Indus Valley Civilization artefacts, relics from ancient India and examples of Mauryan Art.

Mani Bhawan: This is where Mahatma Gandhi stayed when he visited Mumbai between 1917 and 1934. He preached Ahimsa or Non-violence, and it was here that his association with the charkha or spinning wheel began in 1917. It now houses a picture gallery, a 20,000-volume research library and a film and recording archive

Dhobi Ghat: A unique feature of Mumbai, the dhobi is a traditional laundryman, who will collect your dirty linen, wash it, and return it neatly pressed to your doorstep. At Dhobi Ghat the clothes are soaked in lather water, then thrashed on the stones, later thrown into huge vats of boiling starch and then hung out to dry.

Marine Drive: also known as the “Queen’s Necklace” is a pleasant drive along the shoreline of Back Bay, from Nariman Point past Chowpatty and up to Malabar Hill

Dinner will be served at Ramee Guest Line

Overnight in Mumbai Ramee Guest Line (Juhu) – Club Room

Day 03 Mumbai Bollywood Tour

Breakfast at hotel

Morning you will be picked up from the hotel and transferred to Film city with an escort

The Film City is located away from the city life, on a secluded peace of land in the vicinity of Aarey Colony. The Film City is well equipped with large studios for indoor shootings, recording room, a theatre, and facilities like garden, lakes, ground for fighting scenes, helipads etc. for outdoor shooting. The plan for this Film City was prepared and executed under the able guidance of late V. Shantaram, the veteran actor, director and film producer. The Film City is not open to admission without a prior permission. (We will take the permission for you)

Lunch will be served at a Local Restaurant

Mumbai is the center of India’s huge Hindi film industry, producing 120 feature films a year. Much of the glamour associated with the city stems from its celebrated position as the dream-factory of the nation. The local film industry is known as Bollywood. It’s a ragtag speculative trade, flush with black money and low on innovation. The films it produces tend to be spectacular melodramatic fantasies. They are known disparagingly as ‘masala movies’ because they are made to an established formula that mixes a variety of ingredients – action, violence, music, dance, romance and moralizing – into one outrageous blend. While plenty of thought- provoking ‘artistic’ Indian films are appreciated in the west, masala movies are largely viewed with contempt. It’s not hard to figure out why. Stock characters, exaggerated acting, self-conscious editing, implausible, narratives and heroines who burst into song every five minutes are just the beginning of a long list of unlikely features that you are going to have to accept at face value if you want to enjoy a Bollywood flick. Despite being dismissed as escapist claptrap, plenty of masala movies get their narrative drive from social issues like communalism, ethnicity and caste. Many also address the effects of modernization and urbanization on traditional Indian institutes such as the family and marriage. As you’d expect from any vibrant cultural form, masala movies are a reflection of India’s social and political milieu. This doesn’t diminish their appeal or (thank goodness) unduly imbue them with profundity, but it does mean they have an astonishingly direct feed into the lives of their audiences that outsiders may find hard to fathom. On the surface it may be Rambo, Romeo and Robin Hood, but the subtext is likely to be the Mahabharata, dharma, and social justice. In this context , it’s not surprising that masala movies

Evening transfer back to the Hotel

Dinner will be served at Ramee Guest Line

Overnight in Mumbai Ramee Guest Line (Juhu) – Club Room

Day 04, Mumbai (Shopping)

Breakfast at hotel

Full Day car will be at your disposal and will take you to different markets where you can enjoy the shopping

Lunch will be served at a Local Restaurant

Dinner will be served at Ramee Guest Line

Overnight in Mumbai Ramee Guest Line (Juhu) – Club Room

Day 05, Mumbai – Back Home (Flight)

Breakfast at hotel

Check out at 1200 hrs and you will be transferred to International airport to board your flight back Home

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